History of the LGBT FLAG

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History of the LGBT FLAG

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As described by Helms:

“The stripes at the top and bottom are light blue, the traditional color for baby boys. The stripes next to them are pink, the traditional color for baby girls. The stripe in the middle is white, for those who are intersex, transitioning or consider themselves having a neutral or undefined gender. The pattern is such that no matter which way you fly it, it is always correct, signifying us finding correctness in our lives”

The flag is a symbol of kinship and pride in ourselves that can be seen in all sorts of places, including this blog 🙂

Todays post will be about the LGBT Flag!

The rainbow flag, also called the LGBT Pride Flag or Gay Pride Flag. This flag is the symbol of Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual, and Transgender. This flag was mostly used in the 70’s social movements for LGBT.

It is originated in California but is now used worldwide. Is was designed by San Francisco artist Gilbert Baker in 1978, the design has undergone some revisions to first remove then re add colors  due to fabric availability. As of 2008, the most common variant consist of six stripes, with the colors red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet. The flag is flown horizontally with the red stripe on top.

The original gay-pride flag flew in the San Francisco Gay Freedom Day Parade on June 25, 1978.

After the November 27, 1978, assassination of openly gay San Francisco City Supervisor Harvey Milk, demand for the rainbow flag greatly increased. To meet demand, the Paramount Flag Company began selling a version of the flag using stock rainbow fabric consisting of seven stripes of red, orange, yellow, green, turquoise, blue, and violet. As Baker ramped up production of his version of the flag, he too dropped the hot pink stripe because of the unavailability of hot-pink fabric. Also, San Francisco-based Paramount Flag Co. began selling a surplus stock of Rainbow Girls flags from its retail store on the southwest corner of Polk and Post, at which Gilbert Baker was an employee

In 1979 the flag was modified again. When hung vertically from the lamp posts of San Francisco’s Market Street, the center stripe was obscured by the post itself. Changing the flag design to one with an even number of stripes was the easiest way to rectify this, so the turquoise stripe was dropped, which resulted in a six stripe version of the flag — red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet.

Mile Long Flags

For the 25th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots in 1994, flag creator Baker was commissioned to create the world’s largest rainbow flag.It took months of planning and teams of volunteers to coordinate every aspect. The flag utilized the basic six colors and measured thirty feet wide. Foot-wide sections of the flag were given to individual sponsors as part of a fundraiser for the Stonewall anniversary event once the event had ended. Afterwards additional large sections of the flag were sent with activists and they were used in pride parades and LGBT marches worldwide. The Guinness Book of World Records confirmed it as the world’s largest flag.

In 2003 Baker was again commissioned to produce a giant flag. In this case it marked the 25th anniversary of the flag itself. Dubbed “25Rainbow Sea to Sea” the project entailed Baker again working with teams of volunteers but this flag utilized the original eight colors and measured a mile-and-a-quarter (2 km) across Key West, Florida from the Atlantic Ocean to the Gulf Coast Sea. The flag was again cut up afterward, and sections sent to over a hundred cities worldwide.

Rainbow colors as a symbol of gay pride

The rainbow flag has found wide application on all manner of products including jewelry, clothing and other personal items and the rainbow flag colors are routinely used as a show of LGBT identity and solidarity. The rainbow colors have become so ubiquitously recognized as a symbol of LGBT pride and identity in recent years that they have effectively replaced most other LGBT symbols, including the Greek letter lambda and the pink triangle. One common item of jewelry is the pride necklace or freedom rings, consisting of six rings, one of each color, on a chain. Other variants range from key chains to candles. In Montreal, the entrance to Beaudry metro station, which serves that city’s Gay Village, was rebuilt in 1999 with rainbow-colored elements integrated into its design.

For more information please feel free to search google. If you find something interesting, please feel free to email lgbtforme@mail.com. Thank you. D.G.

hot pink: sexuality
red: life
orange: healing
yellow: sunlight
green: nature
turquoise: magic/art
indigo/blue: serenity/harmony
violet: spirit
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One response »

  1. Pingback: Questions To Ask ??????? : Why Not Ask Them? | LGBT Community

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